Kosmoceras

life, biology, fandom, rants

3 notes

These flowers are South African daisies, belonging to genus Osteospermum. Osteospermum (“bony seed”) is a collection of about 50 plant species from family Asteraceae, native to South Africa.

The attractive spoon or pinwheel forms seen here seem to be hybrids or cultivars (please correct me if I’m wrong), or derivatives of Osteospermum fruticosum. Most species appear to possess fairly ordinary, plain ray-flowers.

Top photo is the ‘Pink Whirls’ variety by Jon Sullivan,
Bottom photo is ‘Flower Power Spider Purple’ by Derek Ramsey.

Filed under osteospermum south african daisy jon sullivan derek ramsey daisy asteraceae flower compositae pinwheel daisy spoon daisy botany plants gardening

2 notes

The Floating Lily Fields of Guanling by Gogosardina
Featuring:
giant floating crinoids (Traumatrocrinus hsui)
ammonite (Trachyceras multituberculatus)
fish (Pholidopleurus, Peltopleurus, Birgeria, Guizhoucoelacanthus)
a hybodont shark
turtles (Odontochelys semitestacea)
ichthyosaurs (Quanichthyosaurus, Guanlingsaurus)
a thalattosaur (Xinpusaurus)other marine reptiles (Miodentosaurus & Psephochelys)
for more complete information about the animals featured in this wonderful and richly painted paleo art, read more in the artist’s own gallery.

The Floating Lily Fields of Guanling by Gogosardina

Featuring:

  • giant floating crinoids (Traumatrocrinus hsui)
  • ammonite (Trachyceras multituberculatus)
  • fish (Pholidopleurus, Peltopleurus, Birgeria, Guizhoucoelacanthus)
  • a hybodont shark
  • turtles (Odontochelys semitestacea)
  • ichthyosaurs (Quanichthyosaurus, Guanlingsaurus)
  • a thalattosaur (Xinpusaurus)other marine reptiles (Miodentosaurus & Psephochelys)


for more complete information about the animals featured in this wonderful and richly painted paleo art, read more in the artist’s own gallery.

Filed under triassic period gogosardina floating lily fields of guanling china paleontology paleo-art paleontological reconstructions traumatocrinus crinoid ichthyosaur thalattosaur ammonite

7 notes

Fossil specimen of Seirocrinus subangularis from Houston Museum, Texas. Seirocrinus is a stalked crinoid or a sea lily, cousins of sea stars that are still alive today in our oceans, although they are often limited to greater depths. However, Seirocrinus along with a few other genera, are an interesting case: it grows on floating logs, and it may reach up to 20 meters in total length. These pseudoplanktonic crinoids are most abundant in Jurassic seas, and seem to fill a niche no longer seen in most marine animals, save perhaps the tiny goose barnacles (Lepas, Dosima), which float on the ocean’s surface through a similar strategy. One can only imagine what an interesting sight it must have been. Gigantic flower-like creatures, growing on logs, with stems tall as most trees. Floating just beneath the water’s surface, with ammonoids, fish and ichthyosaurs swarming around it, just as sargassum mats today attract vagrant fauna. Further ReadingImage Source

Fossil specimen of Seirocrinus subangularis from Houston Museum, Texas. Seirocrinus is a stalked crinoid or a sea lily, cousins of sea stars that are still alive today in our oceans, although they are often limited to greater depths.

However, Seirocrinus along with a few other genera, are an interesting case: it grows on floating logs, and it may reach up to 20 meters in total length. These pseudoplanktonic crinoids are most abundant in Jurassic seas, and seem to fill a niche no longer seen in most marine animals, save perhaps the tiny goose barnacles (Lepas, Dosima), which float on the ocean’s surface through a similar strategy.

One can only imagine what an interesting sight it must have been. Gigantic flower-like creatures, growing on logs, with stems tall as most trees. Floating just beneath the water’s surface, with ammonoids, fish and ichthyosaurs swarming around it, just as sargassum mats today attract vagrant fauna.

Further Reading
Image Source

Filed under seirocrinus subangularis seirocrinus echinodermata crinoidea crinoid sea lily echinoderm jurassic paleontology fossil houston museum

63 notes

Sanghyang Dedari, a sacred dance from only a few regions in Bali, which is usually performed by two maidens, during a state of deep trance. The dancers themselves are believed to be possessed (kerauhan) by heavenly spirits (dedari).The ceremony isn’t actually a tourist attraction, rather a performance done whenever farmlands suffer from blight, or in the presence of a disease outbreak. The dance itself is an act to appease the divinities. Image Source

Sanghyang Dedari, a sacred dance from only a few regions in Bali, which is usually performed by two maidens, during a state of deep trance. The dancers themselves are believed to be possessed (kerauhan) by heavenly spirits (dedari).

The ceremony isn’t actually a tourist attraction, rather a performance done whenever farmlands suffer from blight, or in the presence of a disease outbreak. The dance itself is an act to appease the divinities.

Image Source

Filed under sanghyang dedari sanghyang bali indonesia balinese hinduism

1,199 notes

ucresearch:

What trilobites can tell us about how animals evolve
The trilobite, which became extinct millions of years ago, is commonly known as one of the first complex forms of life on earth.  Their fossils can be found in many parts of the world and are often collected for their interesting shapes and varieties. (There’s even a vacuum cleaner designed after this creature…) 
In fact there are actually 20,000 known varieties of this arthropod. They even ranged in sizes from ones that could fit inside your pocket to being as large as your sofa (!!!?!).
UC Riverside’s Dr. Nigel Hughes explains:

"They can have scoops or shovels, be fantastically spiny or beautifully streamlined and diverged to really explore their evolutionary space, but they still maintain that common body plan.”

Scientists study trilobite fossils to understand how today’s animals have evolved to the present.  This can be everything from how mating habits developed to how a species can protect itself from predators.  
Dr. Hughes not only studies the trilobite, but even sings about them.

ucresearch:

What trilobites can tell us about how animals evolve

The trilobite, which became extinct millions of years ago, is commonly known as one of the first complex forms of life on earth.  Their fossils can be found in many parts of the world and are often collected for their interesting shapes and varieties. (There’s even a vacuum cleaner designed after this creature…) 

In fact there are actually 20,000 known varieties of this arthropod. They even ranged in sizes from ones that could fit inside your pocket to being as large as your sofa (!!!?!).

UC Riverside’s Dr. Nigel Hughes explains:

"They can have scoops or shovels, be fantastically spiny or beautifully streamlined and diverged to really explore their evolutionary space, but they still maintain that common body plan.”

Scientists study trilobite fossils to understand how today’s animals have evolved to the present.  This can be everything from how mating habits developed to how a species can protect itself from predators.  

Dr. Hughes not only studies the trilobite, but even sings about them.

(via moniquill)

Filed under nigel hughes trilobite evolution trilobitomorpha paleontology evolutionary radiation gif warning arthropoda fossil

180 notes

currentsinbiology:

Researchers describe 4 new species of ‘killer sponges’ from the deep sea
Killer sponges thrive in the lightless depths of the deep sea. Scientists first discovered that some sponges are carnivorous about 20 years ago. Since then only seven carnivorous species have been found in all of the northeastern Pacific. A new paper authored by MBARI marine biologist Lonny Lundsten and two Canadian researchers describes four new species of carnivorous sponges living on the deep seafloor, from the Pacific Northwest to Baja California.
These animals look like bare twigs or small shrubs covered with tiny hairs. But the hairs consist of tightly packed bundles of microscopic hooks that trap small animals such as shrimp-like amphipods. Once an animal becomes trapped, it takes only a few hours for sponge cells to begin engulfing and digesting it. After several days, all that is left is an empty shell.
Caption: A large group of Asbestopluma monticola sponges grow on top of a dead sponge on Davidson Seamount, off the Central California coast.  Credit: © 2006 MBARI

currentsinbiology:

Researchers describe 4 new species of ‘killer sponges’ from the deep sea

Killer sponges thrive in the lightless depths of the deep sea. Scientists first discovered that some sponges are carnivorous about 20 years ago. Since then only seven carnivorous species have been found in all of the northeastern Pacific. A new paper authored by MBARI marine biologist Lonny Lundsten and two Canadian researchers describes four new species of carnivorous sponges living on the deep seafloor, from the Pacific Northwest to Baja California.

These animals look like bare twigs or small shrubs covered with tiny hairs. But the hairs consist of tightly packed bundles of microscopic hooks that trap small animals such as shrimp-like amphipods. Once an animal becomes trapped, it takes only a few hours for sponge cells to begin engulfing and digesting it. After several days, all that is left is an empty shell.

Caption: A large group of Asbestopluma monticola sponges grow on top of a dead sponge on Davidson Seamount, off the Central California coast.  Credit: © 2006 MBARI

(via ichthyologist)

Filed under porifera carnivory sponge asbestopluma lonny lundsten mbari monterey bay aquarium research institute