Kosmoceras

life, biology, fandom, rants

Posts tagged archosaur

241 notes

scientificillustration:

paleoillustration:

Palaeoartworks: a palaeoart gallery at Lyme Regis, April 7th - May 4th

Mark Witton: “So, what can you expect from the gallery? Hopefully, there’s a wide enough range of restorations to keep most tastes happy: dinosaurs, pterosaurs, Crocodyliformes, invertebrates, marine reptiles, even some fish. These are organised into are three collections. The first is dedicated to palaeoart of the Wealden Supergroup, a sequence of Lower Cretaceous sediments found throughout south-east England with an intensely studied palaeobiota and palaeoenvironment. Regular readers will know that I’ve been publishing a lot of Wealden artwork recently - enough, it seems, to fill the wall of a gallery - and my favourites are now on display." More info

This is part of the Lyme Regis Fossil Festival 2-4 May, 2014

http://www.fossilfestival.co.uk/

Filed under mark witton pterosaur pterosauria archosaur paleo art paleontological reconstructions

4,174 notes

amnhnyc:

Meet Dimorphodon, the toothy pterosaur.
Discovered in the 1820s on the coast of southern England, by a young woman, Mary Anning, famed for her fossil-finding abilities, Dimorphodon earned its names for its distinctive dentition. Dimorphodon, the genus name, means “two-formed tooth” and refers to the animal’s two types of teeth: Long, curved fangs that jut from the front of the jaws, and a row of short pointed teeth that lies behind.
Learn more about this pterosaur.

amnhnyc:

Meet Dimorphodon, the toothy pterosaur.

Discovered in the 1820s on the coast of southern England, by a young woman, Mary Anning, famed for her fossil-finding abilities, Dimorphodon earned its names for its distinctive dentition. Dimorphodon, the genus name, means “two-formed tooth” and refers to the animal’s two types of teeth: Long, curved fangs that jut from the front of the jaws, and a row of short pointed teeth that lies behind.

Learn more about this pterosaur.

(via fuckyeahdinoart)

Filed under dimorphodon dimorphodontid pterosauria archosaur pterosaur mary anning g if warning

140 notes

rhamphotheca:

BOOK REVIEW:

Mark Witton’s Pterosaurs: beautiful, lavish, scholarly and comprehensive

by Darren Naish

I assume you’re here for the Tetrapod Zoology. If so, you’ll have been excited and intrigued by one of 2013’s best tetrapod-themed books: Mark Witton’s Pterosaurs, an enormous, lavishly illustrated encyclopedia of all things pterosaur. Scholarly but highly readable, fully referenced throughout, and featuring hundreds of excellent photos, diagrams and beautiful, colour life restorations, this volume is a must-own, whatever your interest in pterosaurs. And, let’s face it, there aren’t that many books devoted to pterosaurs to begin with, so another one on the market can only be a good thing.

Herein, please find my assorted thoughts on this most excellent book. First of all, though, some disclosure: as readers and followers will likely already know, I’m personal friends with Mark and have co-authored several studies with him. You might therefore conclude that the following review is not impartial; nevertheless, let’s see what happens. For the purposes of convention, I’m going to refer to Mark as ‘Witton’ throughout this review…

(read more: Tetrapod Zoology - Scientific American)

illustrations by Mark Witton

(via incogpollywog)

Filed under mark witton darren naish pterosaur pterosauria book archosaur mesozoic pterosaurs

18 notes

antediluvianechoes:

In the Late Triassic, William Sillin, Dinosaur State Park, 1988/1991

There are eras when life clambers. Meteors fall, sea-levels drop, volcanos poison the sky; biospheres collapse, dynasties end, whole worlds are extinguished. Then life must crawl from the debris to rebuild, to find new forms for old niches. 

The Great Dying was over. Siberia’s geology relaxed; no more did oceans of molten basalt exhale acid aerosols and dust, or blaze through coal beds, transforming them into hurricanes of sun-blocking ash. Now the sky was clean, the air was pure, the crushing heat subsided. Green spread again, and things crept within it. 
But recovery is slow—it’s not rebirth, but relearning. This is how you take a step. This is how you run. This is how you feed and breed, spread seeds and spores, gallop in herds, swarm in shoals, fly, bloom, and thrive. This is fear and this is affection. This is lust and this is greed. This is the sound of aetosaurs huffing, of fabrosaurs chirping, of leaves brushing against a phytosaur’s hide. This is how the sand feels on your toes as you sprint across the Triassic riverbank in the middle of a fifty million-year-long August, breakfast pinched between your teeth, and your tiny heart patting between each step. This is how life emerges from the darkness and makes for itself a new dawn.

antediluvianechoes:

In the Late Triassic, William Sillin, Dinosaur State Park, 1988/1991

There are eras when life clambers. Meteors fall, sea-levels drop, volcanos poison the sky; biospheres collapse, dynasties end, whole worlds are extinguished. Then life must crawl from the debris to rebuild, to find new forms for old niches. 

The Great Dying was over. Siberia’s geology relaxed; no more did oceans of molten basalt exhale acid aerosols and dust, or blaze through coal beds, transforming them into hurricanes of sun-blocking ash. Now the sky was clean, the air was pure, the crushing heat subsided. Green spread again, and things crept within it. 

But recovery is slow—it’s not rebirth, but relearning. This is how you take a step. This is how you run. This is how you feed and breed, spread seeds and spores, gallop in herds, swarm in shoals, fly, bloom, and thrive. This is fear and this is affection. This is lust and this is greed. This is the sound of aetosaurs huffing, of fabrosaurs chirping, of leaves brushing against a phytosaur’s hide. This is how the sand feels on your toes as you sprint across the Triassic riverbank in the middle of a fifty million-year-long August, breakfast pinched between your teeth, and your tiny heart patting between each step. This is how life emerges from the darkness and makes for itself a new dawn.

Filed under extinction triassic the great dying william sillin antediluvianechoes pageantry of life-forms archosaur