Kosmoceras

life, biology, fandom, rants

Posts tagged jellyfish

273 notes

realmonstrosities:

Box Jellyfish, also known as Sea Wasps, are members of the class Cubozoa who are distinct from all other jellyfish.

They’re much faster and more manoeuvrable than other jellyfish, so much so that some of them can actively chase their prey.

Their tentacles are situated on each corner of the four corners of their lower surface. Some species have one, solitary tentacle per corner, others have bundles of over a dozen tentacles per corner.

The weirdest thing about them has to be their eyes. They have 24 of them! 8 of their eyes even have retinas and lenses! These are the best eyes in cnidaria, and they STILL don’t have brain.

All this eyesight may well take it’s toll, one species was seen spending 15 hours per day asleep.

Filed under sea wasp cubozoa box jellyfish jellyfish optics in cnidarians

156,474 notes

hantukopek:

Hundreds of moon jellyfish babies have been born at the Weymouth Sealife centre in Dorset. Aquarists say they have never seen so many jelly babies of all shapes, sizes and colours from many different species at one time - but even though they may look cute many of them are highly poisonous as well.

hantukopek:

Hundreds of moon jellyfish babies have been born at the Weymouth Sealife centre in Dorset. Aquarists say they have never seen so many jelly babies of all shapes, sizes and colours from many different species at one time - but even though they may look cute many of them are highly poisonous as well.

(Source: jonwithabullet, via essayofthoughts)

Filed under aurelia mariculture moon jelly jellyfish scyphozoa semaeostomae ulmariidae cnidaria weymouth sealife centre dorset

97 notes

explosionsoflife:

Periphylla periphylla, the helmet jellyfish.
Despite this jellyfish’s ability to produce phosphorescence, other forms of light are toxic to it. For this reason, helmet jellies usually only move up in the water column at night in search of their planktonic food. Unlike most other cnidarians, P. periphylla does not have an anchored larval stage; rather, it remains pelagic throughout its entire lifecycle.
Photo © Peter David 

I was skeptical when I first read the ‘other forms of light are toxic’ line, but whoa, their own pigments that give them their coloration can really turn lethal when exposed to light of certain intensity (phototoxicity? photodegradation? so it was a bit like inverse melanin?)Fascinating stuff. Read more here

explosionsoflife:

Periphylla periphylla, the helmet jellyfish.

Despite this jellyfish’s ability to produce phosphorescence, other forms of light are toxic to it. For this reason, helmet jellies usually only move up in the water column at night in search of their planktonic food. Unlike most other cnidarians, P. periphylla does not have an anchored larval stage; rather, it remains pelagic throughout its entire lifecycle.

Photo © Peter David 

I was skeptical when I first read the ‘other forms of light are toxic’ line, but whoa, their own pigments that give them their coloration can really turn lethal when exposed to light of certain intensity (phototoxicity? photodegradation? so it was a bit like inverse melanin?)

Fascinating stuff. Read more here

Filed under periphylla coronatae jellyfish scyphozoa cnidaria deep sea bioluminescence

7 notes

Do you know that Palau’s Jellyfish Lake (Ongeim’l Tketau) isn’t the sole place in the world where you can find and swim with swarms of stingless jellyfish pulsing around in a lake?
Then welcome to Kakaban, of East Kalimantan, Indonesia, a saltwater lake that’s probably an uplifted atoll. The jellies are from the genus Mastigias, some others are from genus Aurelia and Cassiopeia, which is the upside-down jellyfish. Cassiopeia (species ornata) can be found littering the bottom of the lake:

Why those two lakes have stingless jellies? I say it’s convergent evolution at work (which curiously employs the same genus, and hence very similar product taxa).

Do you know that Palau’s Jellyfish Lake (Ongeim’l Tketau) isn’t the sole place in the world where you can find and swim with swarms of stingless jellyfish pulsing around in a lake?

Then welcome to Kakaban, of East Kalimantan, Indonesia, a saltwater lake that’s probably an uplifted atoll. The jellies are from the genus Mastigias, some others are from genus Aurelia and Cassiopeia, which is the upside-down jellyfish. Cassiopeia (species ornata) can be found littering the bottom of the lake:

Cassiopeia ornata, Kakaban

Why those two lakes have stingless jellies? I say it’s convergent evolution at work (which curiously employs the same genus, and hence very similar product taxa).

Filed under cassiopeia ornata indonesia jellyfish jellyfish lake kakaban kalimantan mastigias ongeim'l tketau palau rhizostomae rhizostome stingless jellyfish scyphozoa cnidaria

93 notes

doomedbythelivingdead:

orbiculator:

In the light of recent, mysterious video of eldritch abomination from the abyss gelatinous veil like object in the deep sea, here’s a fine digital illustration of strange jellyfish Deepstaria enigmatica (top) and siphonophore Bathyphysa grimaldii (bottom). Artist unknown.

I will wear it as a hat.

Uric the Oddball already beat you to it.

doomedbythelivingdead:

orbiculator:

In the light of recent, mysterious video of eldritch abomination from the abyss gelatinous veil like object in the deep sea, here’s a fine digital illustration of strange jellyfish Deepstaria enigmatica (top) and siphonophore Bathyphysa grimaldii (bottom). Artist unknown.

I will wear it as a hat.

Uric the Oddball already beat you to it.

Filed under deepstaria enigmatica deepstaria jellyfish hat deep sea bathyphysa grimaldii uric the oddball harry potter wizards ravenclaws doomedbythelivingdead