Kosmoceras

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Posts tagged lgbt

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Children of Srikandi
Children of Srikandi Collective 2012 | 73 mins | Indonesia, Germany, SwitzerlandPRODUCER IN ATTENDANCE | New York Premiere
The first film created by and about queer women in Indonesia, Children of Srikandi ties together eight authentic and poetic stories from different directors. Deeply personal and diverse in outlook and form, these contemporary stories are interwoven with beautiful shadow theater scenes that tell the story of Srikandi, a mythological character of the Mahabharata who is neither man nor woman, moving fluidly between both genders. Srikandi’s tale is frequently used in the traditional Javanese shadow puppet theatre plays; here it anchors a collective anthology that transcends the borders between documentary, fiction and experimental film.
On Margaret Mead’s Film Festival.

I would like to expand more about this someday.

Children of Srikandi

Children of Srikandi Collective
2012 | 73 mins | Indonesia, Germany, Switzerland
PRODUCER IN ATTENDANCE | New York Premiere

The first film created by and about queer women in Indonesia, Children of Srikandi ties together eight authentic and poetic stories from different directors. Deeply personal and diverse in outlook and form, these contemporary stories are interwoven with beautiful shadow theater scenes that tell the story of Srikandi, a mythological character of the Mahabharata who is neither man nor woman, moving fluidly between both genders. Srikandi’s tale is frequently used in the traditional Javanese shadow puppet theatre plays; here it anchors a collective anthology that transcends the borders between documentary, fiction and experimental film.

On Margaret Mead’s Film Festival.

I would like to expand more about this someday.

Filed under indonesia indonesian queer community lgbt mahabharata srikandi queer queer people in traditional societies

34 notes

Huffington Post Canada: The Dubious Logic Behind Muslim Homophobia

queermuslims:

  

Dr. Bilal Philips, an influential Islamic scholar, will be speaking at the Canada Day long weekend conference hosted by the Muslim Council of Calgary. He is wellnoted for his literalist approach in prescribing thedeath penalty for “homosexuals” under Sharia law. However, he is neither God’s spokesperson, nor does he speak for all Muslims.

Early in May, the Islamic Circle of North America, a conservative Muslim organization, expressing fear on the destruction of family, released a press statement against President Obama’s support for same-sex marriage. Around the same time,Muslims for Progressive Values, a dissenting grassroots organization, citing the Islamic emphasis on justice, welcomed the President’s courageous statement. Like dissenting denominations in Judaism and Christianity, Islam is not a monolith.

Conservative Muslims argue that by using variants of the phrase “you approach men lustfully instead of women” in verses 7:81, 26:165-166 and 27:55, the Qur’an condemns same-sex relationships as a transgression. However, dissenting Muslims argue that such a reading fails to appreciate context and linguistics. They also mention how extreme fanatics have bastardized the sacred texts by quoting verses stripped of their context.

Based on a contextual analysis, it becomes clear that the Qur’an is portraying a picture of coercion, exploitation and inhospitality. Specifically, verse 29:29 alludes to highway robbery and verse15:70 refers to Lot’s people prohibiting him from entertaining guests. Secondary Muslim texts, including “The History of Al-Tabari” and “Tales of the Prophets” further elaborate on this context.

Based on a linguistic analysis, Alabama based Dr. Hussein Abdul Latif indicates that the Qur’anic words for male and female connote non-receptive and receptive entities respectively. As such, the prohibitive phrase can be construed as approaching an unwilling partner rather than a willing partner. Thus, even the stand-alone phrase appears to connote exploitation.

Furthermore, based on past authorities, both Dr. Hussein Abdul Latif and Dr. Scott Kugle at Emory University have argued against the authenticity of texts attributed to the Prophet on this issue. This only substantiates how conservative Muslims mask their prejudice behind dubious texts.

Conservative Muslims, however, have tradition by their side. They can easily refer to countless manuals of jurisprudence that did not distinguish between consensual and non-consensual homosexual conduct defined specifically as “male anal intercourse.” However, it is important to understand the context in which the classical jurists formulated their opinions.

Based on texts from 1500 - 1800 CE, Harvard based Dr. Khaled El-Rouayheb, has stated that homosexual expression in the Arab-Muslim world predominately occurred in the context of pederasty or power imbalanced relationships. The active-passive dichotomy wherein the passive partner, usually a beardless boy or a male slave, is a far outcry from contemporary same-sex relationships based on mutual love and respect.

It should, therefore, not surprise us that Muslim jurists, maintained a prohibitive stand on homosexual relationships based on the coercion depicted in the Qur’anic verses and the exploitation inherent in the overwhelming majority of homosexual expressions of their time. Contemporary examples of such conduct include the sexual coercion of Iraqi prisoners in the Abu Ghraib prison and the exploitation of the dancing boys of Afghanistan.

In the Classical Muslim period from the 9th to the 12th century, jurists operated in an environment where the influential polymath Ibn Sina set the tone for medical opinion that treated “passive homosexuality” as a nasty psychological phenomenon worthy of punishment. It seems that Ibn Sina’s opinion eclipsed that of Al Razi, another polymath, that “passive homosexuality” resulted from the female sperm overpowering the male sperm during conception.

Rather than accepting sexual orientation, many contemporary conservative Muslim clergy either equate homosexuality with alcoholism or view it as a choice of sexual misconduct. However, Dr. Hashim Kamali, a renowned scholar at the International Institute of Advanced Islamic Studies in Malaysia, has stated that both science and Islamic jurisprudence confirm that sexual orientation is inherent.

Factoring changed social milieu and advanced knowledge of human sexuality, it seems that a renewed Islamic perspective on the issue of same-sex unions is warranted today. Several scholars like the 13th century jurist Imam Qarafi harrowingly critiqued the failure to account for differing conditions and special circumstances in legal rulings.

Conservative Muslims, like their Jewish and Christian counterparts, unwittingly condemn their gay sons and daughters to the closet or cloister. In the false dichotomy between God’s law and human reason, their choice is clear. However, disregarding the need for faith to be reasonable and life-affirming, any religious viewpoint is futile.

American Rabbi Harold Schulweis has clearly stated that he cannot condemn innocent people to a life of misery, pain, torture and anguish. U.S.-based Conservative Judaism and several Christian denominations bless same-sex marriages. Likewise, based on the Prophet’s teachings, progressive Muslims, allude to a higher ethic to support loving same-sex unions.

The Prophet’s teachings paraphrased as “do not harm and accept no harm’, ‘wish for your brother what you wish for yourself” and “facilitate, do not cause difficulties or cause people to detest the law” evoke radical love and are as relevant today as they were 1400 years ago.

I’m sooo dropping Ibn Sina from my list of favorite people. I know that at your time there are lots to discover and the universe is a wholly mysterious thing, but you’re out. Out.

Filed under lgbt muslims lgbt muslim islam ibn sina rant

6 notes

amillionexpectations:

shutupandletmebehappy:

All of my LGBTQ followers should check this out.  It’s wonderful.  Who wants to go to Singapore?!  

This was really nice.

Can I move to Singapore? It’s just an hour away by plane from here.

Well too bad for me that the living cost is going to be very high and I would have some difficulties in finding proper housing anyways

Filed under singapore lgbt pink dot

0 notes

Also, Irshad Manji visited Jakarta (Salihara community to be precise) and Jogjakarta last Saturday, but -

- as usual, the controversy stemming from her opinions and identity made her conference/event cut short due to various threats from local fundamentalist Islamic organizations. (they didn’t even exist until radical movements appeared worldwide, and are tolerated/feared by the government and police force even though they have become the major cause of religious unrest in many areas). What’s even worse is that the police intervened to forcibly terminate the discussion.

From tempointeraktif.com:

Yenny Wahid, one of the daughters of former President Abdurrahman Wahid, deplored the police’s intervention to forcibly end the launching ceremony and subsequent discussion of the book titled Allah, Liberty and Love by feminist writer Irshad Manji at the Salihara Building on May 4, 2012. The intervention is the indication of the State being overpowered by certain parties….

….She added that even the protest staged by FPI outside the building should be facilitated as they were exercising their right to express their disagreement with Irshad’s material. What should have been done however, Yenny said, was to respond against troublemakers. “They can disagree but once they resort to violence, they should be persecuted,” she explained.

Yenny also stressed that FPI should have used other platforms to express their opinions such as holding their own forum protesting Irshad’s ideas, or a peaceful rally. “Ideas have to be fought with ideas,” she said.

If violent means are allowed, there are potentials for such incidents to recur. “Law of the jungle will prevail if we allow ourselves to be defeated by thuggery. The bully wins,” she remarked.

The complete chronology can be seen here. (It’s in Indonesian, I wish there was a translated version. But for those who can read it go ahead).

Fucking disgusting. What the hell people.

Filed under irshad manji lgbt muslim islam fundamentalism rant

3 notes

And the channel suddenly switched to a documentary about gay people, while my mother was watching.

And for a fleeting moment, I feel a tinge of fear. In a badly disguised panic, I left the room quickly.

Whatever commentary she said might reflect that excruciating moment in the future where I will have to come clean about my sexual orientation, to my parents. At such juncture, it would be foolish to expect the positive outcome, as such expectations have an equal chance of disappointing you as well as being rewarding.

And words can break your bones.

People’s views do change. But changes on how people view the abjected ‘others’ often happen in a glacial pace, or none at all. It’s as if the system have made sure that there will always be something for the collective hate to feed on.

Maybe I am a coward. But in a time where family is one of my biggest reason of living, I can find no other way other than avoidance.

Filed under lgbt confession fear coming out

2,706 notes

dank-potion:

xombebe:

thegoddamazon:

howtobeterrell:

two gay fathers and son

And a beautiful Black family. <3

How about, “And a beautiful family. <3”? Why choose to add “black”? I didn’t even register their skin color until I read that comment..
*Shrugs*
-X

No, its not that simple. We live in a world where Black men are universally demoralized for being homophobic and absent fathers. This picture simultaneously defies both stereotypes and its important to recognize that. In addition, they’ll face erasure for being black in the LGQBT community and for being queer in the Black community. Erasing their race isn’t equality, its just dismissive of their specific struggles.

Thank you for pointing that out. The societal expectations toward a particular marginalized group are often incredibly demoralizing and help shape said community, almost always in a very dysfunctional way. I think I will tell my story someday, from Indonesia on how the local gay community simply conform to the most negative aspects of stereotypes that society portray them into. Said conformation is simply because we have very few (next to no) positive role models we can relate to, and aggravated by the polarization effects that usually takes place in most opposing viewpoints.
We’re no Iran, but there are thousands of rotten things to point out.
More about that later when my academic works are finished.

dank-potion:

xombebe:

thegoddamazon:

howtobeterrell:

two gay fathers and son

And a beautiful Black family. <3

How about, “And a beautiful family. <3”? Why choose to add “black”? I didn’t even register their skin color until I read that comment..

*Shrugs*

-X

No, its not that simple. We live in a world where Black men are universally demoralized for being homophobic and absent fathers. This picture simultaneously defies both stereotypes and its important to recognize that. In addition, they’ll face erasure for being black in the LGQBT community and for being queer in the Black community. Erasing their race isn’t equality, its just dismissive of their specific struggles.

Thank you for pointing that out. The societal expectations toward a particular marginalized group are often incredibly demoralizing and help shape said community, almost always in a very dysfunctional way. I think I will tell my story someday, from Indonesia on how the local gay community simply conform to the most negative aspects of stereotypes that society portray them into. Said conformation is simply because we have very few (next to no) positive role models we can relate to, and aggravated by the polarization effects that usually takes place in most opposing viewpoints.

We’re no Iran, but there are thousands of rotten things to point out.

More about that later when my academic works are finished.

(via moniquill)

Filed under lgbt blacks gay parenting gay

615,852 notes

Conversation I heard in the club.

Shy Guy:
Hey there..
Random Guy:
Hey what's up?
Shy Guy:
Nothing much, just wanted to say you are really cute.
Random Guy:
Thanks dude!
Shy Guy:
So, are you here with anyone?
Random Guy:
Yeah, my girlfriend just went to the washroom.
Shy Guy:
Oh God, I'm sorry, didn't know you were straight.
Random Guy:
That's alright it's cool.
Shy Guy:
You don't mind me calling you cute?
Random Guy:
A compliment is a compliment no matter who it comes from.

Filed under awesome tolerance lgbt

5 notes

A million expectations: Religion and attitudes to homosexuality

amillionexpectations:

This is something I wanted to post about last week but then I was in a bad mood so I gave up.

In my experience there are religious people who believe that homosexuality is natural, and are fine with it. Then there are ones who believe it is natural but think that being in a gay relationship is a…

Sometimes, people do evolve their views on LGBTQ and religion. Often it involves them learning from you or their own personal experiences. Truth to be told, I have a friend who used to espouse a philosophy similar to ‘love the sinner hate the sin’ but thankfully these days she seemed to be able to understand me - and all of us - for who we are.

But then again, sometimes they don’t. Maybe if you’re daring enough you can continue letting them to know you better, or even discussing this normally thorny topic provided they have shown signs that they could conduct at least a civil conversation.

I wish you luck on this.

(via amillionexpectations-deactivate)

Filed under lgbt religion