Kosmoceras

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Posts tagged paleo art

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s-c-i-guy:

Amazingly Vivid Dino Illustrations Reveal a Brutal Prehistoric World

Over its lifetime, Earth has hosted countless species. But some of those species, like the dinosaurs, have managed to claw their way into a special place in our imaginations. Now, a new book illustrates the dinosaurs — and many of the beasts of millennia ago — in beautiful, spectacular and vicious style.

In one illustration, tiny Utahraptors tear at the flesh of a much larger creature. Another shows a rather unlikely but fanciful encounter between giant megalodon and funny-looking platybelodon. A more serene image depicts a well-camouflaged little dinosaur sleeping beneath a tree in a lush, green forest.

The Paleoart of Julius Csotonyi, available on May 20, is a collection of artwork by Julius Csotonyi, an award-winning illustrator whose work lives in museums and in science papers. Csotonyi, who holds a PhD in microbiology, works frequently with paleontologists who need help bringing their fossil finds to life. Sometimes, though, he draws whatever comes to mind. According to Csotonyi’s parents, his first illustration, at age 3, was of a dinosaur. “It appears to have been intended to be a rooster,” Csotonyi says in the book.

source

Julius Csotonyi is one of my favorite paleo artists, and even his digital composite works still incorporate some of the sharpest, most detailed digital painting I’ve ever seen. His borderline photorealistic approach is just…wow.

(via arrowtongue)

Filed under julius csotonyi dinosauria dinosaur archosaur mesozoic paleo art paleo artist paleontology paleontological reconstructions reptile warning

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scientificillustration:

paleoillustration:

Palaeoartworks: a palaeoart gallery at Lyme Regis, April 7th - May 4th

Mark Witton: “So, what can you expect from the gallery? Hopefully, there’s a wide enough range of restorations to keep most tastes happy: dinosaurs, pterosaurs, Crocodyliformes, invertebrates, marine reptiles, even some fish. These are organised into are three collections. The first is dedicated to palaeoart of the Wealden Supergroup, a sequence of Lower Cretaceous sediments found throughout south-east England with an intensely studied palaeobiota and palaeoenvironment. Regular readers will know that I’ve been publishing a lot of Wealden artwork recently - enough, it seems, to fill the wall of a gallery - and my favourites are now on display." More info

This is part of the Lyme Regis Fossil Festival 2-4 May, 2014

http://www.fossilfestival.co.uk/

Filed under mark witton pterosaur pterosauria archosaur paleo art paleontological reconstructions

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As a token of apology, here’s a reconstruction of a Silurian trilobite, possibly a Deiphon. Coloration loosely based on crab Portunus pelagicus. (It was supposedly a Deiphon, but the shape is not quite right, and the glabellum - the spherical part of its head - is thoroughly lacking in warty protrusions. Also I’m too lazy to finish the legs and antennae, and definitely didn’t bother with the gills.)This is one of my first paintings without using a scanned pencil linework, a feat I found both frustrating and tedious. How do you guys create sharp edges efficiently in digital painting?
Art by me. Photoshop. THREE FUCKING DAYS

As a token of apology, here’s a reconstruction of a Silurian trilobite, possibly a Deiphon. Coloration loosely based on crab Portunus pelagicus.

(It was supposedly a Deiphon, but the shape is not quite right, and the glabellum - the spherical part of its head - is thoroughly lacking in warty protrusions. Also I’m too lazy to finish the legs and antennae, and definitely didn’t bother with the gills.)

This is one of my first paintings without using a scanned pencil linework, a feat I found both frustrating and tedious. How do you guys create sharp edges efficiently in digital painting?

Art by me. Photoshop. THREE FUCKING DAYS

Filed under paleo art paleontological reconstructions silurian trilobite arthropod deiphon phacopid phacopida marine fossil ART BY ME DO NOT STEEL

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Ammonites and ammonoids are some of the most abundant cephalopod fossils that you can find in any strata before Cenozoic. Much of their biology is unknown, unlike its contemporary the belemnites. Paleontologists know, for sure, that belemnites possess ten arms with equal lengths, each arm lined with hooks; in life they would be fairly undistinguishable from common squids to casual observers. Ammonites however, are only known from the morphology of their shells. No unequivocal traces of its soft flesh have ever been found, thus it’s up to debate on how many arms they might have in life, or what kind of niche they might fill back in Mesozoic and late Paleozoic. To add to the confusion, some species are found with a set of calcareous plates, called aptychus, which have been speculated to function as operculum or even lower jaw, a component of its buccal mass.
One may point out that scientists have inferred much of their lifestyle from the ectocochleate, living Nautilus; however it’s important to remember that they are in fact, quite distant from nautiloids. Some research suggest that many lived in shallow water environments, and therefore it’s not out of possibility that they have advanced visual morphology just like modern coleoids do.
It’s such a pity that there are not a lot of solid paleontological reconstructions for ammonites out there.
Art by Olorotitan.
Edit: The artist tried to depict how an instance of ammonite cannibalism would look like. And obviously, this is not one of those weakly-conceived, half-hearted paleo-arts.

Ammonites and ammonoids are some of the most abundant cephalopod fossils that you can find in any strata before Cenozoic. Much of their biology is unknown, unlike its contemporary the belemnites. Paleontologists know, for sure, that belemnites possess ten arms with equal lengths, each arm lined with hooks; in life they would be fairly undistinguishable from common squids to casual observers. Ammonites however, are only known from the morphology of their shells. No unequivocal traces of its soft flesh have ever been found, thus it’s up to debate on how many arms they might have in life, or what kind of niche they might fill back in Mesozoic and late Paleozoic. To add to the confusion, some species are found with a set of calcareous plates, called aptychus, which have been speculated to function as operculum or even lower jaw, a component of its buccal mass.

One may point out that scientists have inferred much of their lifestyle from the ectocochleate, living Nautilus; however it’s important to remember that they are in fact, quite distant from nautiloids. Some research suggest that many lived in shallow water environments, and therefore it’s not out of possibility that they have advanced visual morphology just like modern coleoids do.

It’s such a pity that there are not a lot of solid paleontological reconstructions for ammonites out there.

Art by Olorotitan.

Edit: The artist tried to depict how an instance of ammonite cannibalism would look like. And obviously, this is not one of those weakly-conceived, half-hearted paleo-arts.

Filed under ammonite cephalopod paleo art paleontological reconstructions fossils