Kosmoceras

life, biology, fandom, rants

Posts tagged red

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bogleech:

starkinglyhandsome:

odditiesoflife:

The Astonishing Annual Red Crab Migration

Named one of the planet’s most breathtaking migrations, the Christmas Island red crab exodus is a natural phenomenon that continues to astonish.

Making it onto CNN Travel’s recent list of the “10 most spectacular wildlife migrations,” the island’s annual red crab migration is an astounding event that involves the movement of millions of vividly colored crabs as they leave their in-land homes to breed and release eggs into the sea.

An Australian territory, Christmas Island lies some 2,600 kilometers north-west of Perth in the middle of the Indian Ocean. While just 1,500 people live there, it is home to an estimated 120 million crabs.

CRABS ARE HERE

When I was little, nature specials talked about how people allegedly didn’t care about the crabs, ran them over by the thousands and they would eventually disappear. I remember being five and actually crying about it.

Now they close roads and have special crab routes and everyone in their right mind loves living on Too Many Crabs Island.

Filed under gecarcoidea natalis christmas island crab crabs crab christmas island swarm warning swarming arthropoda crustacean crustacea arthropod red

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What's the Deal With Vermilion? A Brief History of a Very Old Color

fuckyeahchinesemyths:

I am putting this link here because you guys will totally get to find out  why this colour is associated with the Chinese, hence the term, “Chinese red.” This piece also covers how significant this colour was in other cultures and times, too.

Awesome

(via moniquill)

Filed under vermilion red chinese red pigments color cinnabar these tags sound like something from Gen I pokemon

13 notes

ichthyologist:

Velvet whalefish (Barbourisia rufa)
Inhabiting depths of down to 2000 m, the velvet whalefish is the sole known member of its family Barbourisiidae. Red light does not penetrate down to those depths, which has resulted in the inability to detect red in most deep sea creatures. The colouration of the fish aids in camouflage against prey and predators. 
Image source

ichthyologist:

Velvet whalefish (Barbourisia rufa)

Inhabiting depths of down to 2000 m, the velvet whalefish is the sole known member of its family Barbourisiidae. Red light does not penetrate down to those depths, which has resulted in the inability to detect red in most deep sea creatures. The colouration of the fish aids in camouflage against prey and predators. 

Image source

Filed under whalefish velvet whalefish barbourisia rufa deep sea red

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The Hudoq Mask of the Kenyah Dayaks, from Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo)
The color red, black, white and yellow. Of course they were derived  from the easy-to-find earthy pigments such as clay, coal, chalk and  ochre, but still, it’s amazing for me that these colors often crop up  as divine representations, symbols or cosmological concepts. On the  contrary, blues and greens are somewhat rare, even though the colors exist in  nature in such abundance. The pigments that produce blue and green however, are not.

The Balinese represent the Hindu trimurti with  the color red, white and black - each representing Brahma, Vishnu and  Shiva, although I forget which is which. Two oceans and two continents  apart, the Mayans had Chac the god of rains and thunder, which was an  embodiment of four separate gods: the Red Chac of East, White North  Chac, Black West Chac and Yellow South Chac; while some other cultures  view red, white, black and yellow as primary colors of mankind, and are  considered sacred.

I can confidently say that all four colors have been  overrepresented in artworks crafted and fashioned by virtually all  indigenous cultures across the world.
It’s just wonderful.

The Hudoq Mask of the Kenyah Dayaks, from Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo)

The color red, black, white and yellow. Of course they were derived from the easy-to-find earthy pigments such as clay, coal, chalk and ochre, but still, it’s amazing for me that these colors often crop up as divine representations, symbols or cosmological concepts. On the contrary, blues and greens are somewhat rare, even though the colors exist in nature in such abundance. The pigments that produce blue and green however, are not.

The Balinese represent the Hindu trimurti with the color red, white and black - each representing Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva, although I forget which is which. Two oceans and two continents apart, the Mayans had Chac the god of rains and thunder, which was an embodiment of four separate gods: the Red Chac of East, White North Chac, Black West Chac and Yellow South Chac; while some other cultures view red, white, black and yellow as primary colors of mankind, and are considered sacred.

I can confidently say that all four colors have been overrepresented in artworks crafted and fashioned by virtually all indigenous cultures across the world.

It’s just wonderful.

Filed under cultures hudoq borneo kalimantan red white black yellow cultures myths symbolism repeating patterns