Kosmoceras

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Posts tagged squid

292 notes

rhamphotheca:

Diversity of Squid

The giant squid may be the biggest, but it’s not the only squid in the sea. Scientists estimate there are about 500 species of squid. Some are surprisingly tiny—only about 2.5 cm (1 in) in length. Others are impressively large. There are three species of giant squid (Architeuthis), the largest of which may grow up to 16 m (50 ft) long. And there are other large squid as well—including one known as the colossal squid (Mesonychoteuthis hamiltoni). Despite these vast differences in size, all squids share certain features: long, cylindrical bodies, usually with eight arms and two long feeding tentacles; and two fins that help them balance and maneuver as they swim.

(image: Kim Moeller/Smithsonian Institution)

(via scientificillustration)

Filed under teuthida histioteuthis lycoteuthis chiroteuthis cranchia leachia promachoteuthis watasenia squid squid diversity biodiversity deep sea mesopelagic

136 notes


Figure. Two photographs of the same Taonius borealis showing eye orientation. Left - Anterior view with laterally oriented eyes. Right - Anterior-oblique view with anteriorly oriented eyes. Photographs © 2011 MBARI.

This squid is Taonius borealis, a species of deep-sea glass squid whose arms are always tucked up in a fancy pompadour.
It can also see your pathetic, wretched soul
It can also see into forever.

Figure. Two photographs of the same Taonius borealis showing eye orientation. Left - Anterior view with laterally oriented eyes. Right - Anterior-oblique view with anteriorly oriented eyes. Photographs © 2011 MBARI.

This squid is Taonius borealis, a species of deep-sea glass squid whose arms are always tucked up in a fancy pompadour.

It can also see your pathetic, wretched soul

It can also see into forever.

Filed under taonius borealis squid deep sea mbari cephalopod mollusk

113 notes


The sea is full of saints. You know that? You know that: you’re a big boy.
The sea’s full of saints and it’s been full of saints for years. Since longer than anything. Saints were there before there were even gods. They were waiting for them, and they’re still there now.
Saints eat fish and shellfish. Some of them catch jellyfish and some of them eat rubbish. Some saints eat anything they can find. They hide under rocks; they turn themselves inside out; they spit up spirals. There’s nothing saints don’t do.
Make this shape with your hands. Like that. Move your fingers. There, you made a saint. Look out, here comes another one! Now they’re fighting! Yours won.
There aren’t any big corkscrew saints any more, but there are still ones like sacks and ones like coils, and ones like robes with flapping sleeves. What’s your favourite saint? I’ll tell you mine. But wait a minute, first, do you know what it is makes them all saints? They’re all a holy family, they’re all cousins. Of each other, and of … you know what else they’re cousins of?
That’s right. Of gods.
Alright now. Who was it made you? You know what to say.
Who made you?
— The prologue of Kraken, by China Mieville.

Gamochonia, by Ernst Haeckel in Kunstformen der Natur.
From top left, clockwise:
Histioteuthis bonnellii
Chiroteuthis veranyi
Pinnoctopus cordiformis
Octopus vulgaris(ventral)
Octopus vulgaris (dorsal)

The sea is full of saints. You know that? You know that: you’re a big boy.

The sea’s full of saints and it’s been full of saints for years. Since longer than anything. Saints were there before there were even gods. They were waiting for them, and they’re still there now.

Saints eat fish and shellfish. Some of them catch jellyfish and some of them eat rubbish. Some saints eat anything they can find. They hide under rocks; they turn themselves inside out; they spit up spirals. There’s nothing saints don’t do.

Make this shape with your hands. Like that. Move your fingers. There, you made a saint. Look out, here comes another one! Now they’re fighting! Yours won.

There aren’t any big corkscrew saints any more, but there are still ones like sacks and ones like coils, and ones like robes with flapping sleeves. What’s your favourite saint? I’ll tell you mine. But wait a minute, first, do you know what it is makes them all saints? They’re all a holy family, they’re all cousins. Of each other, and of … you know what else they’re cousins of?

That’s right. Of gods.

Alright now. Who was it made you? You know what to say.

Who made you?

The prologue of Kraken, by China Mieville.

Gamochonia, by Ernst Haeckel in Kunstformen der Natur.

From top left, clockwise:

Histioteuthis bonnellii

Chiroteuthis veranyi

Pinnoctopus cordiformis

Octopus vulgaris(ventral)

Octopus vulgaris (dorsal)

Filed under cephalopod china mieville kraken squid octopus chiroteuthis veranyi pinnoctopus cordiformis histioteuthis bonnelliiu octopus vulgaris gamochonia

30 notes

Another flying squid similar to Todarodes pacificus, but the Tree of Life website says that it’s probably Ommastrephes bartramii. On the Sea of Japan, photographed by Geoff Jones.
The photograph clearly illustrates certain features, including the webbing/gliding membranes, wide lateral fins, and the bright blue marking above the eyes.

Another flying squid similar to Todarodes pacificus, but the Tree of Life website says that it’s probably Ommastrephes bartramii. On the Sea of Japan, photographed by Geoff Jones.

The photograph clearly illustrates certain features, including the webbing/gliding membranes, wide lateral fins, and the bright blue marking above the eyes.

Filed under squid flying squid ommastrephes bartramii sea of japan cephalopod

41 notes

theseablog:

5 favourite cephalopods countdown, no.4: Japanese Flying Squid, Todarodes pacificus.

Commonly growing to around 40-50 cm, these squid can jump out of the water and have been seen covering distances of 50 m above the surface. Often mistaken for Flying Fish, they are commonly found in the northern pacific. Pretty cool. 

yessssssssssss

(Source: seascienceweekly)

Filed under flying squid todarodes cephalopod squid

15 notes

plarchie:

When squid meets octopus who will win? #squidofcourse #eightleggedwimps                                 

yeahsev


For some reasons, Japan is heavily associated with octopus in my mind. Polynesian and Nordic cultures are pretty much the only other ones that feature cephalopod imageries prominently in their arts and mythology (and maybe Hellenistic cultures as well but not much in my opinion).

plarchie:

When squid meets octopus who will win? #squidofcourse #eightleggedwimps                                 

yeahsev

For some reasons, Japan is heavily associated with octopus in my mind. Polynesian and Nordic cultures are pretty much the only other ones that feature cephalopod imageries prominently in their arts and mythology (and maybe Hellenistic cultures as well but not much in my opinion).

Filed under Japan Octopus Squid Cephalopod